Jump In & Move Beyond Good Enough

“Jump in OB. The water’s great,” they shouted up to me from the quarry.

“Yeah, yeah, I’ll be there in a minute,” I shouted back.

But secretly I was thinking: Umm, there’s no way I am jumping in that quarry. My little buddy, Fear, and I will just hang out and watch everyone else have a great time.

Sitting on the edge watching everyone else leap forward is good enough.

That was the scene about 15 years ago during the Tyler Place Resort Mountain-Bike Ride, the capstone to our family vacation. Each Friday at Tyler Place, guests head out for a mountain-bike ride through Vermont’s single track, which hugs Lake Champlain. It’s great fun.

And the piece de resistance of the ride is throwing caution to the wind and jumping into the quarry. It’s a 34-foot drop (see video) from the edge to the water below.

The easy part, at least for me, was the mountain-bike ride. The jump? Not so much. 

I’m a strong believer of Sheryl Sandberg’s lean in message. I love it because as a business leadership coach and motivational speaker, I witness many people who  just sit on the sidelines and settle for good enough rather than choosing to lean in and take action. 

The truth is, sometimes, to really breakthrough to the next level of success, you need to jump in with both feet.

I was doing plenty of leaning in at the quarry. I would gingerly walk to the edge, look down, gulp, and scurry back. I did this about three times until I finally asked myself: What would you do if you weren’t afraid?

The answer: I would jump in.

In that moment, I knew I had a choice. I could listen to my little buddy Fear, or I could leap forward into the unknown and jump in. 

I ended up jumping in four times that day.

That literal leap of faith gave me the confidence I needed to make the decision to jump from executive leadership to starting my own coaching and consulting firm.

As I was making my decision on my career jump, my reliable little buddy Fear showed up again to harass me and stir up limiting beliefs.   

Michael, what if you can’t provide for your family?

What if you embarrass yourself?

What if you can’t run your own business?

Just like at the quarry, I had to take a leap of faith. Neither leap was easy. But, I realized I had a choice: I could let Fear drive my decision or I could trust my talents, instincts, and enthusiasm and jump in. 

And again, I jumped.

I’m so thankful I did.

Whether you’re jumping into a quarry, voicing your opinion, changing careers, or going for that big promotion, Fear has a way of making you doubt yourself. It does everything it can to hold you back.  

Your job is to name the Fear and jump in in spite of it.

So, let me ask you: What would you do if you weren’t afraid? 

How would your work be different? 

Are you tired of settling for “good enough?” 

If you answered yes, that’s terrific because you know that good enough isn’t really good enough if you want to maximize success in your career and life.   

If you are looking for a partner who can help you move beyond good enough, I encourage you to contact me today. Reference this blog post, in our call, and I’ll give you a special offer to help you leverage your belief system and maximize your career and life.  

Go ahead. What are you waiting for?  Jump in. The water is great. 


In his coaching practice, Peloton Coaching & Consulting, Michael O'Brien partners with today's business leaders to help them move from functional performance to optimal performance. His aim is to change lives by enhancing leadership energy, engagement, and fulfillment, and demonstrating how these qualities can cascade throughout organizations. To Learn more about Michael and Peloton Coaching & Consulting, visit www.pelotoncc.net.

Source: www.pelotoncc.net

"Put Away the Milk, Please” – The Importance of the Basics in Growing Your Business

I’ve taken plenty of workshops and training classes, but some of the best lessons I’ve learned are from my family and home life.

Today I’m sharing two of my favorites:  

“Put Away the Milk, Please” – The Importance of the Basics

When my youngest daughter was 4, she became self-sufficient when it came to making breakfast. Every morning, she’d get out the cereal box, the orange juice, and the milk.

Like most 4 year olds, she was great at getting things out; however, putting them back was not one of her strong suits.

The cereal and orange juice were easily forgiven. But the milk—oh, the milk. That was a different story. 

My favorite post-workout treat is a glass of cold chocolate milk. As an avid cyclist, I’ve used it as my post-workout recovery drink long before it was considered a “recovery drink.”

In the mornings, after I returned from my ride, I did some stretches, and pretended to do some core exercises as my thoughts drifted towards my anticipated glass of cold chocolate milk.

But, when my daughter forgot to return the milk to the refrigerator…Yep, you got it, the milk would be luke-warm.

Have you ever tried drinking luke-warm milk after a workout?

Not so great.

So, instead of downing my favorite treat, I would have to pause to patiently remind her of the importance of putting things away, especially the milk. After a while she got it, and order was restored in the world—at least where chocolate milk was concerned.

There’s a lesson in there for all of us. Regardless of whether you are a leader or individual contributor, your organization counts on you to “put away the milk.” It’s a basic responsibility. 

When the basics are done well, you have time for other meaningful work like selling your vision, evaluating your strategy, strengthening your culture, and developing your people.  

So, how much time do you spend asking others “to put away the milk?” What’s it costing you and your organization?

Take it Upstairs - A Leader at Work and Home

In my home, anytime something needs to go up to the 2nd floor, my wife and I place it on the stairs. There’s no email, no vmail, no memo attached; it’s simply understood that if something is on the stairs, it needs to go up.

When our kids were young, we were pleasantly surprised when they took the initiative to carry something upstairs. It was unexpected, and clearly one of those “we-got-this-parenting-thing-down” moments, and it balanced out some of our “milk challenges.”

As the other adult in the house, it was expected that I’d carry things upstairs. When I did there were no gold stars, no perk-points, no attaboy-memos from the CEO. However, it was valued as it was a basic task that helped the household run smoothly.

Here’s the lesson: If you see something on the stairs, take it up. You may not have put it there, and it may not belong to you. That’s not the point.

Regardless of whether it’s a broken process or helping a short-staffed team, your job, as a leader, is to pitch in and help solve the problem. Don’t walk past it and declare it someone else’s job. When you take action, you send a powerful leadership message about the culture you wish to create.

The basics aren’t sexy. But the truth is, they never go out of style. 

So how much time do you spend on the reinforcing the basics? What are those constant reminders to fill out expense reports correctly, see the opportunities within the challenges, and behave like the competition is outside and not within costing you and your company? 

If you took time to add it up, it would probably be significant. It may be costing you stress, engagement, effectiveness, efficiency, and, most likely, top and bottom-line maximization.  For a moment, imagine what would be possible if the basics were second nature, the milk was always put away and things were matter-of-factly taken upstairs.

If you are interested in sharing a glass of chocolate milk, I’m game. Just contact me at Michael@pelotoncc.net


In his coaching practice, Peloton Coaching & Consulting, Michael O'Brien partners with today's business leaders to help them move from functional performance to optimal performance. His aim is to change lives by enhancing leadership energy, engagement, and fulfillment, and demonstrating how these qualities can cascade throughout organizations. To Learn more about Michael and Peloton Coaching & Consulting, visit www.pelotoncc.net.


Source: www.pelotoncc.net

6 Sure-Fire Career Boosters

I chose the niche of career coaching because I am passionate about helping people find a path that is rewarding, fun and lucrative. My commitment stems from personal experience. My career path was forged by taking risks, following my heart, and not being afraid to color outside the lines.  I have a degree in information systems, and have worked as an interior decorator, a nonprofit fundraiser, and now a career and life coach.  I know a bit about demanding bosses, getting promoted, and knowing when to leave – including reinventing myself more than once.  This is why I am focusing more of my energy on helping others navigate the sometimes challenging waters of the workplace and exploring “what’s next” – including entrepreneurship.  Critical to all of this is knowing how to listen to your inner voice, and trusting yourself.

First, let’s work on gaining some forward momentum – no matter what your path: 

1.    Get out of neutral.  Sometimes we’ve stayed too long at our current workplace, and it shows. The excitement is gone, and we are doing that dreaded countdown from Monday through Friday.  If (and ONLY if) you value your workplace, and are invested in staying there, make a conscious decision to “bloom where you’re planted”.  Actively engage your manager about ways to improve your job performance, learn a new skill or take on more responsibility. Speak up in meetings.

2.    Learn how to self-promote (without being obnoxious).  There is some truth to the adage “nice guys/girls finish last”.  The workplace is nothing if not competitive. And unfortunately just “doing a good job” will not necessarily get you noticed or promoted.  It may make you a valuable member of the team. You’ll be known for being dependable and reliable – but perhaps taken for granted.  Learn how to toot your own horn. Make suggestions and share good ideas. Become your own PR agent.

3.    Dress for success.  Appearances DO matter. If you come to work wrinkled and disheveled, people may not take you as seriously. It is sometimes said that you should dress the part of your next job. In my opinion, it’s not a bad policy. Take yourself seriously, and others will too.  You don't have to spend thousands on a designer wardrobe. But a nice quality suit with a variety of tops or shirt and tie combos can go a long way.  If your workplace is not so formal, you can buy some strategic pieces to mix and match without breaking the budget.

4.    Get a mentor. We are all connected, and it’s important to seek guidance from people who’ve been there.  A mentor can help you navigate the tough spots and develop strategies for advancement. S/he can be an invaluable resource for networking and job search.  Think about an expert in your field with whom you can cultivate a closer relationship.  It can be someone you know already, or you can pick someone who you’d like to learn from and reach out to him or her.

5.    Know when it’s time to go. Sometimes it’s just TIME TO GO. Period. There may have been a leadership or political sea change at your workplace, or you are dealing with a difficult boss who is either intimidated by you, a micro-manager, or who just doesn’t like you for some reason or other.  Or, as I mentioned before, you are just not into it anymore. Maybe you’ve hit a ceiling and there is no room for advancement.  And of course, there is the option of entrepreneurship. Do you have a window of opportunity to follow your dream and hang out your own shingle? Be sure you have a good strategy for a strong start, but if you’re ready, go for it!

6.    Take risks. Nobody got anywhere playing it safe.  Well that’s not entirely true.  People who play it safe are able to hold on to jobs for a very long time – and that’s great. If you want to be promoted, advance, lead, or make more money – it may not be the best strategy.  Be willing to speak your mind, to disagree with your boss, to suggest a new idea that might help your organization succeed.  If a position opens up at your workplace (or elsewhere) that you’re interested in, go for it.  Nothing ventured, nothing gained! 

 As always, here’s to you – and to your truth. My prayer  for you is a fun, balanced and fulfilling life. 

Until next time… Trina  


Trina Ramsey is a career and life coach, specializing in personal transformation and career transition. With 20 years of experience in business and management, Trina is a "people person" and a change agent. Trina started her business, Perspectives Plus Coaching in 2009 after spending 15 years as a nonprofit fundraiser and experience running her own interior decorating business. For more on Trina visit trinaramsey.com. @PerspectivePlus  or https://www.facebook.com/CareerTalkWithCoachTrina