Grace

In saying grace for the food we eat, thank also those who bring it to us.

 

Thank the soil

The plants

The children picking food in pesticide filled fields

The animals raised without light and sun and dirt and freedom

To the sun

The rain

The earth

The insects that pollinate it

The winds, the rain and snow.  

 

The humans who toil

The oil in the trucks

The trucks and truckers

The plastic it comes wrapped in.  

 

The compost it creates

The fertility of what our bodies turn it into.

 

The water that washes the food

The dishes

The human waste

 

We are part of wholeness

Let us be grateful.


Nika Annon incorporates Nuero-linguistic programming (NLP) & Nuero-plasticity techniques to help individuals move beyond limiting beliefs & assumptions that hold them back & create new habits to reinforce the changes which create the desired outcomes. To learn more about Nika, please visit www.nikaannon.com

Source: www.nikaannon.com

The Little Things

A simple song that moves you to tears.  A walk in the park that reminds you of nature’s beauty.  A gentle hug that lets you know someone cares. The smell of freshly cooked food that brings anticipation of a good meal. The first compliment you get that causes you to blush.  The kiss that takes your breath away. 

All of these simple things are beautiful, heartfelt, and treasured at the exact moment you experience them.  However, once the moment is gone, one might consider these same moments as small, little, and un-noteworthy.  We forget that life is made up of a multitude of happy, sad, painful, and beautiful moments thoughtfully woven together.  Moments that often times are overlooked as insignificant because in the pursuit of our happiness, we only look forward to grand moments, planned special occasions, and the big events that will bring us hours of pleasure or happiness.

Sadly, when something injures us, those are the moments that are remembered and held onto tightly.  We allow a scar to form and often remind ourselves of it, not allowing it to properly heal.  Don’t hold so tightly onto the moments that bring sadness or cause pain. Allow those moments to bring you understanding of yourself and others.  Allow those moments to aid you in your growth.  Then allow those moments to pass, only to be reflected upon to thoughtfully remember the lesson gained.

Throughout your life, don’t trip yourself up with thinking in either terms of “grand” or “insignificant”, the simplest gesture from you toward someone, can hold deep meaning to them.  It can make their day!  It can inspire!  It can bring about positive change!

Remember, all things in life are fleeting.  Don’t take the little things for granted, because they disappear in a heartbeat.  They can melt away like the winter snow giving way to the birth of spring.  Cherish all things in your life that hold meaning to you, even if it's just a moment.  Express gratitude for all things in your life, for all things that come to you, for all things you are given.

Are the little things really the little things?

Peace and Love to the Universe!!!


Monica Ortiz is a successful Life Coach, Author, and Speaker whose award-winning work has touched thousands of lives over her 20-year career. Her debut book in 2013 received over 100 five-star reviews and critical acclaim, and has led to speaking invitations at leading institutions such as Stanford University on topics ranging from Success in Your Career and Relationships to Shifting Your Energy to Shape Your Reality. She is founder of The Universe Series, a professional organization bringing the tools she teaches to millions of people around the globe. To learn more, visit www.theuniverseseries.com

Source: www.theuniverseseries.com

Leaning Into Gratitude To Cope With A Loved One’s Cancer

Russ Terry

Russ Terry

The C word.  Cancer.  No one wants to hear it, especially from an immediate family member.  A few weeks ago, my Mom phoned with startling news:  her annual mammogram had turned up something “highly suspicious for malignancy.” I was stunned, shaken, sad, upset, scared.  You name it and I felt it – such a range of emotions.  I’m not going to lie or sugar coat it.  It’s been a rough few weeks.

On the positive side, however, there’s so much I have been grateful for in this situation.  Oh, let me count the ways:

1.       I’m grateful that she’s gotten her mammogram every year for 30 years and does a self-exam on the first of every month.  (Great advice for all women!)  Even if it did turn out to be cancer, I was optimistic that it was caught early and hopeful that this time next year we could not only go on the vacation to Italy that we’ve been planning, but could use the occasion to celebrate life, health, how much we love each other, and our Italian heritage, of which we’re very proud!

2.       I’m grateful for an incredibly wise and supportive group of colleagues.  Right before this all happened, I came to know not one or two but THREE people who would prove immensely helpful.  Two are breast cancer survivors and one is an expert on grief.  It’s like God planted them in my life to make sure I was OK.  Wow.

3.       My friends have been excellent.  I’m so grateful for their support, prayers, positive thinking and encouragement.  Thinking about them makes me smile.  So many have passed on good wishes to me, which I have forwarded to my Mom.  She is grateful, too, which makes me even happier to have all of them – and her – in my life.

4.       I’m so glad I have a job that’s flexible and enabled me to be by her side for her pre-lumpectomy consultation with her surgeon.  I’m grateful for the doctor and his calmness, and that my Mom, my sister and my Mom’s significant other could all be there with her.  We even went out to eat afterward, which we otherwise would never have done on a random Wednesday in early August.  It was lovely!

5.       Finally, I’m grateful that we got some very good news within the last few days.  Although Mom does have breast cancer, it has not spread. The surgeon said that he’ll likely be able to get everything out when he does the lumpectomy (on September 11th, please keep us in your prayers), and that she won’t need chemotherapy.  Phew!  What a relief.

When I shared the good news with people who are grappling with more difficult cancer experiences, I felt so guilty.  But they were incredibly happy for me.  I’m grateful
for their generous spirits.

You may get good news.  You may not.  Either way, you can always find something to be grateful for, even in tough situations — and now I know ESPECIALLY in tough situations.

Interesting postscript: I sent this to my Mom for her review before submitting it.  I wanted to make sure she was OK with it.  Here’s what she said: “Even if the diagnosis had been the type that needed chemo and radiation I would still be positive because more and more people are surviving cancer.” So inspiring, right??


For information on Russ, visit his website www.russterrylifecoach.com.

Russ Terry and Grief Coach, Jill Smolowe, are co-hosting an in-person workshop, “The Grief-Gratitude Connection,” to be held in New York City on September 15.  For more info and to purchase tickets, visit: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-grief-gratitude-connection-strategies-for-easing-the-stress-of-caregiving-and-the-pain-of-loss-tickets-9972777847